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From the time we arrive in Antarctica to the time we depart, we hurry around working to obtain our samples, get them processed, collect good data, and get the samples prepared for shipping home. Then it’s packing, cleaning, and rushing to get on a plane. The whole month is a whirlwind of science. It’s a blast, but it’s also exhausting.

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The C507 Soil Team in front of the Crary Lab. From left to right: Jessica Trout-Haney (Dartmouth), Dan Bransford (Virginia Tech), Summer Xue (Brigham Young), Tandra Fraser (Colorado State), Diana Wall (Colorado State), Walter Andriuzzi (Colorado State), Ashley Shaw (Colorado State), Jeb Barrett (Virginia Tech), Ruth Heindel (Dartmouth), and Byron Adams (Brigham Young).

I’ll give you the overview of what we did this season: In summary, we sampled five core studies at six different sites, applied treatments to two core studies at three sites, completed lab work on 420 soil samples, serviced meteorological stations, collected samples from aeolian (wind-blown) sediment collectors, and collected additional soil samples from multiple locations for our work in labs back home. Mixed in with this work are repairs to equipment, weather delays, establishing proper communications at field sites, and ensuring work is done in a safe way that preserves the Antarctic environment.

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Diana Wall takes a soil sample near Marr Pond in Taylor Valley. Photo by: Ashley Shaw

The first priority for work is sampling core studies, which are critical to the NSF Long Term Ecological Research program’s mission. So, on nine different trips (both overnight and day trips), we went to the McMurdo Dry Valleys via helicopter to sample our core experiments and long-term study sites. These included the Stoichiometry Experiment, the P3, the Elevational Transects (read about these here or here), the LTM, and the controls from the BEE plots. We bring these soil samples (each one weighs about 500 grams) back to the lab for processing (you can read about our soil extraction process here). Once the nematodes and other critters have been extracted, we use a microscope to help us identify and count every individual animal from each sample. Not only do we study which species are present, but also details about their life history, including their sex and whether they are alive or dead. This gives us information about community trends. At the same time, we are performing soil chemistry measurements to evaluate soil carbon, pH, salinity, phosphorus, and nitrogen. These chemistry data help to indicate which environmental conditions are most (or least!) suitable for life. We also extract and measure chlorophyll-a as a proxy for primary productivity.

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Jess weighing soil for soil chemistry analyses. Photo by: Ruth Heindel

Besides sampling these experiments, we also have to apply treatments to some of the core experiments. This year, we applied treatments to the P3 and the Stoichiometry Experiment. The P3 treatment took place over a couple days, and required Byron, Jeb, and Dan to stay at F6 camp and walk to the experimental plots. You can read about the treatments (here), but in short, this treatment involves pumping water up from Many Glaciers Pond, sterilizing the water, and pumping the water down slope at the subsurface to simulate melt flowing over the permafrost. The Stoichiometry Experiment requires nutrient treatments to be prepared in the lab (you can read about that here), this then requires hauling ~30 carboys filled with nutrient solutions (about 5.6 liters in each carboy) out to our experimental plots and applying those solutions.

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Byron carries carboys full of nutrient solutions to the Stoichiometry Experiment plots in Taylor Valley. F6 camp in the background at right. Photo by: Walter Andriuzzi

We went out on a few more day trips to put in new batteries and check on our meterological stations, take samples from and repair aeolian sediment collectors, and to collect some more samples to take back to our labs at home (for individual projects such as PhD or Masters projects).

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Summer and Byron are happy that the meteorological station in Miers Valley is now fixed and working! Photo by: Ashley Shaw

We are happy scientists –we had great weather with very few delays, our samples are ready to ship home, and all of the data has been collected for this season.

Mission complete!

Written by: Ashley Shaw

Over the past few days, we have been in the field taking full advantage of the small windows of good weather to collect our data and take our samples. And we have had several successful days of fieldwork throughout the last week. Last Saturday, two groups were deployed to two sites in Taylor Valley. One group – Zach, Byron, and Nicoletta (our Italian colleague) – visited Hjorth Hill near the New Harbor site at the mouth of Taylor Valley to set up a moss and lichen study. They went there searching for mosses so that they could help Nicoletta establish some experimental plots. These plots are a continuation of a moss and lichen study that has been set up across Victoria Land, Antarctica. The group had 30 minutes of recon with the helicopter to help them find a good spot for the study. They spotted Hjorth Hill from the air and once on the ground they found that it was full of interesting mosses! Most of the time they were there, the weather was pretty bad, but, luckily, windows of good weather opened up when the helicopter dropped them off and when it came to pick them up.

Check out the video that Byron took of Zach blowing sediment off of the moss beds, revealing a vibrant green carpet underneath. Is the sediment insulating the moss?

Zach and Nicoletta at the Hjorth Hill site. Photo: Byron Adams

Zach and Nicoletta at the Hjorth Hill site. Photo: Byron Adams

The other group – Matt, Ashley, Tandra, and Andy, went to the South side of Lake Bonney to complete treatment of the stoichiometry experimental plots (which you can read about here) and brought back 6 BEE control plots at Bonney. They had a wonderful day in the field, but they are all happy to be finished lugging 25lb jugs of water around! It was snowing while they were there, adding to the chilly ambiance of Antarctic work!

We were surprised to see so much snow covering the valley floor on Saturday. It's a rare sight this late in the season. From this view, you can see Lake Fryxell as we fly up valley. Photo: Ashley Shaw

We were surprised to see so much snow covering the valley floor on Saturday. It’s a rare sight this late in the season. From this view, you can see Lake Fryxell as we fly up valley. Photo: Ashley Shaw

Tandra prepares treatments while Matt applies treatments at Lake Bonney. Photo: Ashley Shaw

Tandra prepares treatments while Matt applies treatments at Lake Bonney. Photo: Ashley Shaw

On Monday, Byron, Ashley, Tandra, and Matt went to the South side of Lake Hoare in Taylor Valley where several of our experiments and sampling plots are located. We took samples from the BEE plots (read about that experiment here) and from the elevational transect (ET) study while Byron serviced the meteorological station.

Life endures! Flipping over rocks at the high elevation site, Ashley finds cyanobacteria that are vibrant green. Growing underneath of the rocks provides some shelter and slightly warmer temperatures, even some light passes through the thin pieces of rock. Photo: Ashley Shaw

Life endures! Flipping over rocks at the high elevation site, Ashley finds cyanobacteria that are vibrant green. Growing underneath of the rocks provides some shelter and slightly warmer temperatures, even some light passes through the thin pieces of rock. Photo: Ashley Shaw

The elevational transect study began in 1993. The purpose of this study is to see how elevation and topography affects soil life and soil properties, and how this changes over time. The number of soil nematodes, rotifers and tardigrades has been measured at 3 elevations (83, 121, and 188m above sea level) every 2-4 years since 1993 along with soil chemistry, moisture, and primary production. This long-term record is very valuable and helps us to monitor how changes (such as increased temperature, solar radiation, and moisture) impact the ecosystem. Additional elevational transect studies were added in Garwood and Miers Valleys in 2012. But more on those newer transects later…

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View of the low elevation plot. Photo: Ashley Shaw

The elevational transect at the South side of Lake Hoare begins low on the slope near Lake Hoare and near the helo pad where we were dropped off. But to reach the higher elevation sites, one must hike up the steep slope to the south. It’s quite a climb, but the view from the top is a great reward!

View from the top elevation of the ET in Taylor Valley. You can't tell from this picture, but we are way high on the slope! What a hike! Whew! Photo: Ashley Shaw

View from the top elevation of the ET in Taylor Valley. You can’t tell from this picture, but we are way high on the slope! What a hike! Whew! Photo: Ashley Shaw

Written by: Ashley Shaw

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